Acorn (Mac pixel-level editor) for $15

Discussion in 'Hot Deals - Find a Great Deal? Share It Here.' started by sfmurph, Apr 10, 2014.

  1. sfmurph

    sfmurph Mu-43 Regular

    Jul 4, 2013
    San Francisco
    • Like Like x 1
  2. GFFPhoto

    GFFPhoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 24, 2013
    Pixelmator is only 16 bit on a mac pro (strange marketing decision for sure), and I drive an iMac... Acorn says they will do up to 64 bit, so I'm going to try it out. Thanks!
  3. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Great price! Have you used both this and Photoshop? If so how does it compare? I am looking for a replacement to PS since the CC crap.
  4. WendyK

    WendyK Super Moderator

    Feb 28, 2014
    Northern Virginia
    Real Name:
  5. wanderenvy

    wanderenvy Mu-43 Regular

    May 11, 2012
    Are you sure you are comparing the same criteria?

    One may be the bit depth of the image file (as in 16 bit TIFF) and the other the bit width of the processor/CPU (as in 64 bit intel Xeon).

    There are no 64 bit image files. The human eye can't detect gradations over 14 bit so 16 bit is quite sufficient.

  6. GFFPhoto

    GFFPhoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 24, 2013
    Thanks, I'm probably not comparing the same criteria. Does Acorn edit 16bit?
  7. wanderenvy

    wanderenvy Mu-43 Regular

    May 11, 2012
    I haven't used Acorn but a google search suggests that it does. The two seem fairly well matched with a few pluses and minuses each.
  8. synthetictone

    synthetictone Mu-43 Regular

    May 22, 2013
    Atlanta, GA
    Real Name:
    Don't forget GIMP ... free as PS alternative
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  9. kwalsh

    kwalsh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Mar 3, 2012
    Baltimore, MD
    I was looking for an inexpensive but reasonably powerful pixel level editor that included scripting support. This looks like a good one, thanks for posting the link. Should be a nice lightweight "edit in" option from Lightroom.

    As to GIMP - yeah well I certainly never forget it to be sure, have to use it from time to time on my work machine and it, along with KDE and GNOME, is my frequent reminder as to why Linux will never become a practical consumer desktop. Of course most consumers don't have a desktop at all anymore, so that's probably just fine :smile: