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Accident on xmas eve: severe lens scratch :(

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Rinaldo, Dec 25, 2015.

  1. Rinaldo

    Rinaldo Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Aug 9, 2012
    Sao Paulo, Brazil
    I thought I have left my G7 plus the 12-35/2.8 in a safe place, but didn't noticed there was an ornamental rock near it and my nephew chose the same place to put his stuff… so you can imagine the end of the story: santa gave me that beautiful deep double scratch.

    Yes, my fault of course, no lens hood or protection filter…. :( I tested the lens in some situations, and yes, it shows up kinda easily.

    The only thing that comes to my mind is to send the lens in, but I have no idea if Panasonic makes this kind of repair. I live in Brazil (they are not here) so would have to count on a friend that is here for vacation to take the lens to the US and then send it to repair.

    Do you guys agree that it would be the best (likely the only one) solution?

    Does someone have a contact e-mail for this kind of issue?

    Thanks! And Merry Christmas to all!

    lens_scratch21.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2015
  2. demiro

    demiro Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nov 7, 2010
    I can't help with contact info, but I wanted to send my condolences. Ouch. That's bad.

    Hope you have a Merry Christmas anyway!
     
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  3. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
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  4. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    One tip I've seen is to black out the scratches to prevent them from causing flare. You can reversibly try this by putting some very thin strips of electrical tape over the scratches. If that fixes the visible effects, you can use a paint pen or equivalent to permanently address them.

    Discussion here: "Blacking in" Lens scratches - Photo.net photo.net Forum
     
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  5. Rinaldo

    Rinaldo Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Aug 9, 2012
    Sao Paulo, Brazil
    Thank you Amin. Will try this later.
     
  6. QualityBuiltIn

    QualityBuiltIn Mu-43 Veteran

    351
    Jan 1, 2011
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Merry Christmas,

    Obviously the correct answer is a replacement element but it could be worth trying the stuff designed to repair car windshields. Very low cost and you've got nothing to lose.

    Remove Scratches from Your Windshield

    2016 will be better

    Cheers
     
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  7. Jfrader

    Jfrader Guest

    Ouch! That is one of the worst I've seen. :frown:
     
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  8. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Ouch! You ought to post that next time there is one of the endless threads about whether UV filters and/or lens hoods are important.

    The sad truth is that the manufacturers' flat rates to repair lenses often exceed the value of the lens. I hope that does not turn out to be the case for here. May the Panasonic fairy smile on you!
     
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  9. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    Lens caps work too! Same as camera bags.
    Try to send it for repair quote, but do not have high hopes. Their quote may to be more than buying used lens in great condition.
     
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  10. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Unlike a windshield, camera lenses have coatings on them and the recommendations in that link would make the lens worse.

    Cutting a piece of electrical tape thin enough to only cover the scratch would be a neat trick. I do have a Sharpie Pen with a very fine point that would work for blacking those scratches. Even permanent ink is removable from glass, without damaging the coatings, using alcohol or acetone.
     
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  11. QualityBuiltIn

    QualityBuiltIn Mu-43 Veteran

    351
    Jan 1, 2011
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    My apologies - suggestion was made with only good intentions.
     
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  12. Ctein

    Ctein Mu-43 Regular

    Dear Rinaldo,

    You don't need an expensive repair.

    First, though, do NOT, under any circumstance, attempt to polish out the scratches or fill them in with a transparent material. You will make things worse; you **will** degrade the existing optical quality. You may make the lens unusable.

    The only effect of those scratches will be that they scatter light, so the lens will show more flare. If you fill in the scratches with opaque ink (a marking pen like a sharpie is NOT opaque), the lens will perform as good as new. Use a carbon-black ink like india ink or high quality black drafting ink. You can fill them in with a fine spotting brush, or you can wipe ink over the scratches, let it thoroughy dry and clean off the ink outside the scratches with a solvent like alcohol or acetone (careful-- do not let the solvent run into the edge of the lens and DON'T SCRUB-- wipe gently). Don't worry if there's a little ink outside the scratches; it won't have any effect. (Other than to turn your f/2.8 lens into a f/2.7999 lens.)

    pax / Ctein
     
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  13. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    652
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    Sharpies work reasonably well for this, even if not totally opaque. But I'd steer clear of acetone for removing excess ink. Acetone is too effective at dissolving many plastics, so would be quite likely to mark the body of the lens. A little lighter fluid or gasoline on paper tissue will wipe sharpie ink (or most other permanent inks) off if required, with less risk to the plastics.

    We use acetone regularly in the lab for cleaning glassware, and residual traces of it on my hands have marked numerous pens, safety glasses (actually polycarbonate for impact resistance) etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2015
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  14. Tony Rex

    Tony Rex Mu-43 Veteran

    275
    Apr 6, 2015
    Melbourne, Australia.
    Tony Rex
    I use Pelikan Plaka casein paint if I want something really opaque filling small crevices. But any black acrylic paint from a hobby shop would do as just fine. E.g Tamiya XF1.
     
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  15. MacBook

    MacBook Mu-43 Regular

    183
    Jul 24, 2010
    South Carolina
    Rinaldo,

    I can understand your situation, sort of.

    In mid-November, my front car windshield developed a crack, but insurance replaced it for free. (No photo available.)

    Then, I discovered that when my small camera bag fell, the UV filter got smashed and the rim bent. I got the glass out without incident, but haven't been able to unscrew the filter from the lens yet.

    Cracked UV filter.jpg
    Finally, the Sunday after Thanksgiving, we heard a big thud, and looked outside (in sunny, calm weather), only to find a tree limb had crashed into my car and broken into several large pieces, damaging the rear window and window frame, as well as some collateral damage. Ouch. Insurance paid two-thirds of the bill, but I expect it will affect my insurance bill renewal.

    Rear window damage.JPG
    I guess that accidents happen. Thank goodness no living beings were injured in the process!
     
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  16. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    One other suggestion for @Rinaldo@Rinaldo

    Before you go filling in the scratches with opaque ink, gently and safely clean the front of the lens. It may will turn out that some of what you see as a scratch is more of a mark that will wipe off.

    I don't doubt that there are gouges there which would benefit from filling in, but some of what we're seeing here may be marks that will clean off.
     
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  17. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for.—J. A. Shedd.
     
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  18. Rinaldo

    Rinaldo Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Aug 9, 2012
    Sao Paulo, Brazil
    Thanks everybody for your attention and hopeful words. Maybe the traditional repair will not be needed (and worth it) as some of you have pointed out, not counting it would be very painful to me (getting the right info like repair cost and feasibility, plus shipping and returning) because I'm in South America.

    I'll read everything carefully and look for the right tools here in my country, to fill/cover the scratches with something black and more opaque as possible.

    And I'll post the results here for sure! :2thumbs:

    For now take a look at the assassin rock (yes, I was an idiot to put the naked lens near it :dash2:), plus two examples, at f/20 (with the visible spot) and at f/2.8, where it goes out completely, as expected. In that scene I had a strong back light, so the spot become really visible. In other preliminary tests (I did not take the picture actually yet) without strong back light, I can't see the spot.

    12-35_scratch-495.jpg 12-35_scratch-2.jpg 12-35_scratch-2-2.jpg
     
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  19. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    That's pretty good. I can't tell anything at 2.8 and I clearly know where the image would be affected from the f20 image.
     
  20. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    Yes, like sensor dust or spots, it is most likely to show up at very small apertures, so if you can avoid shooting above f/8, I'm sure it will be much less noticeable. I expect also that ctein's suggestion of the black paint will help a lot, too.

    It sucks to have something nice damaged, and it can make you want to overreact, but after the heat of the moment, hopefully you'll find it won't be nearly so bad as you thought and you can live with it without having to adjust your shooting much, if at all.