A word of caution (about fungus)

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by mauve, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    I follow another photography mailing list, and a recent discussion popped there about fungus. I appears that under some very moist climates (Australia for instance), there have been reported cases of fungus growing between the cemented IR filter and the sensor of some cameras, Canon models to be precise, but it can be just a magnifying effect due to the number of those sold. Result is a destroyed camera, because on those models the IR filter can't be removed and the replacement of sensor+IR assembly cost more than buying a new camera.

    One can never be too cautious, so it should be advisable to store digital bodies in dry places, possibly with some sort of silica gel nearby if the camera has been exposed to a moist atmosphere. [edit] This is especially relevant to us :43: crowd as many like to pop whatever old lens comes into their hands on the camera. And old lenses are really known to be carriers of fungal infections, so better think twice before risking ruining a camera.[/edit]

    Link to pictures showing the horror (not for the faint of hearts) :

    Rebel XT :

    EOS 30D :

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  2. Streetshooter

    Streetshooter Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    Phila, Pa USA
    That's a good post you just made.
    I also read that over there but glad you posted.

    The photos sure as heck aren't a pretty site.
    Thanks for this....
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  3. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Real Name:
    Wouldn't happen if you used your camera every day.

  4. pdh

    pdh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    May 6, 2010
    i read up a lot about fungus when i first acquired some old glass, and the impression i get is that opinion is divided about whether fungus is "infectious", with the largest number being in the "no it isn't" camp ... i also read a lot of statements to the effect that the spores are always going to be present in lenses, it's just the conditions in which they are stored that makes the difference.
    but then, the internet ,,, it's just a talking shop really ... :smile:
  5. Pan Korop

    Pan Korop Mu-43 Veteran

    Mar 31, 2011
    Phare Ouest

    I was born in southeast Asia, where it used to be called Indochina and more precisely Cochinchina.

    No air conditioners, plus munsoon... Damp even for us froggies, not to mention the cameras.

    Some would sail (later, fly...) back home, and take their moldy lenses to Angénieux's who made a good business of all that cleaning, repolishing, recementing. Incidentally, they accepted much later, in the mid-80's, to save my Kodak 14 in. Commercial Ektar (Ilex Commercial #5 shutter). Not from funghi, from the previous merkin owner very abrasive (Image Of Silk ?) necktie he used to swipe it with!

    Anyway, my folks, and many others, had a trick in Asia, called armoire chauffante or heating closet. A plain, man tall, narrow sort of cupboard, with a few holes or louvres in the door. Inside, a plain 25W to 40 W lightbulb, permanently alight. Sometimes there was also a small, slow, electric fan. Is all. A couple big tins of silica gel (blue-tinted, turned clear when exhausted) were an option, but not necessary.

    Cameras, radios, costly fabrics, all would get in for the night, while we went under the mosquito nets : no mold, no fungus, no mildew, no frogs à la malaria ;)

    PS : just realized such a cabinet is a lot like a darkroom film drying cabinet, except with shelves and a simple lightbulb instead of the heater. Maybe a use for that old darkroom hardware of yours ?
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