A pool of water in an abandoned quarry

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by PeterB666, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. PeterB666

    PeterB666 Mu-43 Top Veteran Charter Member

    780
    Jan 14, 2010
    Tura Beach, Australia
    Real Name:
    Peter
    The place is Bombo Headland about 90 minutes drive South of Sydney. This place is a bit like the land of the lost or some alien planet - you know there are Daleks out there...

    [​IMG]
    A pool in the quary - Bombo by peterb666, on Flickr

    Shot with an Olympus E-P1 and 9-18mm zoom set to 9mm. The aperture is f/10 and for 1/125s with the ISO at 200 and -1 EV on the meter.
     
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  2. BBW

    BBW Super Moderator Emeritus Charter Member

    I had to look up what Daleks are, but can easily believe they're there!

    Really, Peter, your photographs continue to astound me. I've been remiss about keeping up with your Flickr stream.

    Many thanks!
     
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  3. PeterB666

    PeterB666 Mu-43 Top Veteran Charter Member

    780
    Jan 14, 2010
    Tura Beach, Australia
    Real Name:
    Peter
    Thanks

    This was just an off the cuff casual shot (well not quite) while doing a resonance for a future dawn shoot. There is some crazy sea stuff on the other side of those rocks and not for the faint hearted at night.
     
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  4. Brian Mosley

    Brian Mosley Administrator Emeritus Charter Member

    Dec 15, 2009
    Peter, do you find it tempting to shoot the 9-18mm at 9mm very often? I know that when I'm using an UWA lens... I almost always find myself shooting as wide as possible.

    I love the mZD 9-18, but I suspect the 7-14mm will end up in my kit also :biggrin:

    Cheers

    Brian
     
  5. PeterB666

    PeterB666 Mu-43 Top Veteran Charter Member

    780
    Jan 14, 2010
    Tura Beach, Australia
    Real Name:
    Peter
    I use it at 9mm most of the time. I either want a wide vista or to emphasise something very close with the background receding.

    I am looking at wider too but not in MFT. I will probably go for a Nikon cropped sensor camera and the Sigma 10-20mm zoom as a camera exclusively for wide shooting.

    I simply could not use the 7-14 for what I do as I cannot use grads with it. It is hard enough to get good early sunrise shots with a grad and blending - little only without grads.

    Where the MFT 9-18 wins is that it is one of the widest effective focal length lenses that you can get by with using cheap P-Series sized filters. You pay almost double going up to Z-Pro filters.
     
  6. bilzmale

    bilzmale Mu-43 All-Pro

    Had a wide Visa but it wouldn't fit in my wallet. :rofl:

    Another nice shot Peter. Must get out with the 7-14 soon myself.
     
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  7. PeterB666

    PeterB666 Mu-43 Top Veteran Charter Member

    780
    Jan 14, 2010
    Tura Beach, Australia
    Real Name:
    Peter
    Dodgy wireless keyboard.
     
  8. JoepLX3

    JoepLX3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    Jun 13, 2010
    Japan
    Going small for cheaper filters, smart, but not good for those filter companies, the have to come up with plan B. Also, although in real photography no comparison, those build-in software filter are damaging their market as well.

    Will a polarizer between the lens and sensor work just as well as at the end of the lens? Theoretical I would say yes, but I don't all the coating stuff within lenses. Wouldn't it be sweet to have that "laying" over your sensor and you can use it for every lens (controlled electronically, icw gray filter)? Maybe lower cost to make (less material) and higher selling price (more value).
     
  9. PeterB666

    PeterB666 Mu-43 Top Veteran Charter Member

    780
    Jan 14, 2010
    Tura Beach, Australia
    Real Name:
    Peter
    No where near as effective. Basically you need to use filters to stop blowouts. Once the data has blown out you have lost it. There are only very limited options to recover a blown out part of an image and they are only ever partially successful.

    How would you rotate it? I don't use Polarisers much, I have never been overly fond of them and they make a mess of ultra wide shots anyway as the sky is not evenly polarised. It varies as you approach the big light source stuck up there in the blue bit.