A mutant

Olympist

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comment23

Mu-43 Top Veteran
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Hampshire, UK
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Simon
Bizarre! Coincidentally I just harvested this from the garden.
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Must be a good year for mutants.
 

archaeopteryx

Gambian sidling bush
Joined
Feb 25, 2017
Messages
1,183
@Olympist, are you sure this is a mutation rather than variable anthrocyanin expression across the fruit? Fragaria cultivars are selected for colour and several localizable up and down regulators are known (e.g. Lin 2018, Hossain 2018, Zhang 2018, Lin-Wang 2014).

Bizarre! Coincidentally I just harvested this from the garden.
My memory is one of the members here found a tomato with two horns in their garden and posted pictures some time ago. Not having luck finding it on a search at the moment, though.

I'm unsure development of horns or noses in tomatoes has been studied. There's a number of online sources which indicate a horn or nose as an additional locule arising from the fruit (you could "dissect" yours and see, if you haven't already). Some indicate this as triggered by high nighttime temperatures during fruit set and some describe it as a mutation affecting 1 in 1000 plants. However, none of these cite a peer reviewed source, I'm failing to find any supporting information in peer reviewed literature, and I'm exceptionally dubious a consistent transcription error would occur with 0.1% probability. It seems to me a simpler explanation would be potentially any tomato could develop horns but the triggering conditions are sufficiently uncommon it hasn't been worth trying to breed the behaviour out of cultivars.

Commercially, I'd presume such fruit is simply sorted for sauces or other uses where its form isn't an aesthetic concern but there's probably someone here who knows the agriculture better than I do.
 

Olympist

Mu-43 Regular
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
116
@Olympist, are you sure this is a mutation rather than variable anthrocyanin expression across the fruit? Fragaria cultivars are selected for colour and several localizable up and down regulators are known (e.g. Lin 2018, Hossain 2018, Zhang 2018, Lin-Wang 2014).

My memory is one of the members here found a tomato with two horns in their garden and posted pictures some time ago. Not having luck finding it on a search at the moment, though.

I'm unsure development of horns or noses in tomatoes has been studied. There's a number of online sources which indicate a horn or nose as an additional locule arising from the fruit (you could "dissect" yours and see, if you haven't already). Some indicate this as triggered by high nighttime temperatures during fruit set and some describe it as a mutation affecting 1 in 1000 plants. However, none of these cite a peer reviewed source, I'm failing to find any supporting information in peer reviewed literature, and I'm exceptionally dubious a consistent transcription error would occur with 0.1% probability. It seems to me a simpler explanation would be potentially any tomato could develop horns but the triggering conditions are sufficiently uncommon it hasn't been worth trying to breed the behaviour out of cultivars.

Commercially, I'd presume such fruit is simply sorted for sauces or other uses where its form isn't an aesthetic concern but there's probably someone here who knows the agriculture better than I do.
I have no idea, maybe there has been a runner inside the inflorescence... Anyway, I have eaten it :crying:
 
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