A Long Journey with Micro 4/3

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by dbrantley13, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. dbrantley13

    dbrantley13 Mu-43 Regular

    54
    May 17, 2012
    Well, tomorrow marks the beginning of what will certainly be the most action packed six months of my young life.
    For starters, I will be living in the capital of Ghana, Accra, for two months.

    Highlights of this will hopefully include a safari and visits to "Mountain Paradise", a monkey sanctuary, and the Cape Coast slave castles. (mentioned this in another thread). I also hope to develop my street photography skills here as I expect the city to be filled with life and interesting people (3.5 million of them, actually). For this trip I'll be relying on my trusty E-PL1, as I wasn't able to get my hands on the new EM-5 in time.

    Upon my return to the states at the beginning of August, I'll have about 10 days to gather myself, hopefully acquire an EM-5, and get packed again for a venture to Southeast Asia.

    Two weeks in Singapore to hopefully hit all the best locations, and 5 days or so in Koh Samui, Thailand. Any recommended stops I should make in Singapore or Koh Samui?

    From there I'll head to Gold Coast, Australia for a semester of school at Bond University. I expect to visit Sydney, the Great Barrier Reef, do some skydiving and hopefully some scuba diving/surfing. Maybe I'll get the chance to visit Melbourne, too. And after that 3 month span, I plan to conclude with a week in New Zealand (south island). It seems like a photographer's paradise, so I can only hope you all have some advice for me here!

    I have an additional week of open time as well, and, funds permitting, I might spend more time in Australia,visit Bali, or return to Singapore.

    Well, I'm terribly sorry for rambling, but I felt this post was appropriate for the :43: forums because I will be all over the place for nearly 6 months, and I won't have to worry about being worn down by equipment at all :biggrin:

    I'd love to hear any advice, input, thoughts or recommendations any of you seasoned travelers (and seasoned photographers) might have for me regarding equipment and sites to see.

    All the best.
     
  2. Jermonic

    Jermonic Mu-43 Veteran

    228
    Jan 14, 2012
    Denmark
    I can give you a bit advice with regards to the South Island of New Zealand.

    Te Anau and the mountain ridge you experience from the Kepler Track is absolutely fantastic. If you're daring enough, you could hike half of it during the wintertime (I was there in july), provided the weather is alright. Snow does a difference. Seeing a god damn parrot at 1100 meters of altitude is quite the sight. I also happened to experience an earthquake (7.8) up on the track. I've never seen a sunrise quite like this.

    Photos from there (not all of them that exact spot though): New Zealand - a set on Flickr
     
  3. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    Go to Tasmania.

    Otherwise there's not really any point coming to Aus :)
     
  4. dbrantley13

    dbrantley13 Mu-43 Regular

    54
    May 17, 2012
    Thanks for the advice! I'll be there in mid-December. I will keep your suggestion in mind - your photos do a great job to showcase the beauty of the trail and its views. Also, the idea of a parrot up there blows me away.
     
  5. dbrantley13

    dbrantley13 Mu-43 Regular

    54
    May 17, 2012
    It definitely seems like it's going to cost a bit to get there from Brisbane, but hey, I do have that extra week! I'd love to go there, although I haven't the faintest idea of what to expect (all I know is of the cartoon character :biggrin:)
     
  6. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    I should probably elaborate... If you can get to Melbourne, it's not much further to Tasmania. A lot of people never get down here but it's well worth the trip. The Overland Track especially is simply stunning as a photographic journey - a serious alternative to NZ South Island.

    Check out my collection from the Overland here Cradle Mt/Lake St Clair NP - a set on Flickr

    I work on the track, so if you needed any advice send me a PM :smile:
     
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  7. dbrantley13

    dbrantley13 Mu-43 Regular

    54
    May 17, 2012
    To my pleasant surprise, flights actually don't seem too bad :smile:

    Not to sound like a sissy, but do you think the trip could/should be done solo? I'll be traveling with friends for most of my other trips, but may elect to go on my own for the last trip I take (growing experience or something like that)...

    Are their organized hiking trips led by guides? That could serve as an alternative to needing a buddy to go with.

    P.S. Beautiful photos - I see your comparison to the New Zealand trip now.
     
  8. Ralser

    Ralser Mu-43 Regular

    67
    May 28, 2011
    All I can talk about is my experience from20-30 years ago. I did a number of the major bushwalking in SW tassie (E and W Arthur's, south coast to SW cape, Gordon splits, plus others I can't remember; I'd have to look at a map), always in a group with friends. I 've also done a numbers of the major tramps in the south island of NZ (routeburn, Kepler(just after it opened), dusky sound and 1 other I can't remember), solo. Looking back on it after 20-30 years, I'm glad I did it this way. Things may have changed now, but I found it easier to do NZ solo, and SW tas in a group. The scenery is speccy in either place.

    Steve, now in Madison.

    GH2, 14-42, 14, 20, zuiko 50 f1.8, 45-175. www.stevenralserphoto.com
     
  9. dbrantley13

    dbrantley13 Mu-43 Regular

    54
    May 17, 2012
    Thanks for the advice!

    I know we have some Singaporean users here, do you chaps have any recommendations that an unknowing tourist might overlook?
     
  10. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    Haha doesn't sound like a sissy at all - that's the most sensible question you could ask I reckon.

    As long as you have a reasonable level of fitness and the appropriate gear (sturdy boots, wet-weather gear, thermals, stove, etc...) there's no reason you couldn't do the Overland Track solo. It's amazingly well marked and constructed (about half is boardwalk) with fantastic (and free) huts every night. During peak-season there'll be between 30-60 people leaving every day and everyone travel north-south, so you'll be walking near people all the time.

    My only suggestion woudl be to hire a personal EPIRB (safety/distress beacon) from the Parks and Wildlife office at the start - it's only like $20 and gives you a way out it something goes seriously wrong.

    The Southwest walks mentioned by Steve above are a VERY different proposition - the Eastern and Western Arthurs are two of the most difficult tracked mountain traverses in the world. DO NOT go there alone.
     
  11. Ralser

    Ralser Mu-43 Regular

    67
    May 28, 2011
    I never got round to doing the overland track.

    Steve

    GH2, 14-42, 14, 20, zuiko 50 f1.8, 45-175. www.stevenralserphoto.com