A few thoughts and questions: E-M5ii

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I wasn't planning on getting an E-M5ii. I actually sold my E-M5 a couple months back simply because I wasn't using it much. I really only took it when I wanted the convenience of two bodies with two lenses or I knew there would be a chance of water or dust. Otherwise it sat on the shelf.

Then there was a user in the Buy & Sell forum with a really good deal on an E-M5ii. It proved to be too good to pass up.

The E-M5ii does everything that my long-in-the-tooth E-M10 does, with the added benefit of things like High Res shot, focus stacking, better EVF, better IBIS (more on that later) and a few other things. And it comes in a package that really isn't much different in size than the E-M10.

I am still in the 'testing' phase of using focus stacking, but I think it can have some nice results. I will keep working on it.

I have only tried High Res shot a couple times. It really produces a big file! Like focus stacking, I will have to play with it more before I come to any conclusions about it.

The EVF was something that I never really complained about in my E-M10, but the newer camera really does have a better panel, it is higher resolution and better color representation.

As for the IBIS. Maybe I am used to my 3-axis E-M10, but I don't feel like I am getting any better results with the E-M5ii. I feel like I should be able to hand hold for longer SS than with the older camera. It just doesn't seem I can. I have went into the menus multiple times to make sure I have the settings correct. Maybe it will just take a little more time. I have shot with the E-M10 for several years now.

I am not so happy about the flip-out screen. I like the tilting one on my E-M10 better. Although being able to flip it out is a feature that is nice to have at times. I think the best solution would be a screen that does both, like Fuji and Pentax have.

Overall I am very pleased with the E-M5ii. It really does do everything my E-M10 did plus more, so that makes me happy.

Now for some questions:

Is the tripod mount hole shorter on this camera? I can't screw in my tripod plate with the same screw I use to hold my E-M10 or my older E-M5. I actually have to add a washer to take up space so that it will tighten down. This seems odd to me.

I can't seem to find how to set the LCD to display just the SCP. With my E-M10 I can have the LCD showing the SCP and use the EVF for viewing, with the option of changing the LCD to Live view if necessary. I like using the camera with all of those settings simply displaying on the LCD. I know that I can hit the OK button to bring up the SCP, but I would rather it be on as default and switch to Live View when needed. Is this possible with the E-M5ii?

The options on programmable buttons is extensive. I think I am narrowing down my setup. Anyone have suggestions on how to use the function buttons?

Anyway, here are a few examples of some of my successes with the new camera. These are probably crossposts from other threads.







 
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One more thing. What non-photographer product designer decided to put the power switch on the left top plate? The location on the E-M10 and E-M5i was perfect. You could bring the camera to your eye while turning it on all with one motion. Now it takes two hands to do the same.
 

mauve

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can't seem to find how to set the LCD to display just the SCP. With my E-M10 I can have the LCD showing the SCP and use the EVF for viewing, with the option of changing the LCD to Live view if necessary. I like using the camera with all of those settings simply displaying on the LCD. I know that I can hit the OK button to bring up the SCP, but I would rather it be on as default and switch to Live View when needed. Is this possible with the E-M5ii?
Yes it is possible. You have to engage the energy saving mode for this to work.
Cheers,
M.
 
Joined
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One more thing. What non-photographer product designer decided to put the power switch on the left top plate? The location on the E-M10 and E-M5i was perfect. You could bring the camera to your eye while turning it on all with one motion. Now it takes two hands to do the same.
Not super efficient, but I believe it's a design nod to the original 35mm film OMs.
 
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With my E-M10 I can have the LCD showing the SCP and use the EVF for viewing
Hi TNcasual, I had the same problem and found out it comes down to how the EVF auto switch works. I couldn't get the auto switch to work from LCD to viewfinder until I tried this:
Pull out the LCD screen, flip it fold it back under the EVF. Then the auto switch will work from LCD to EVF! Now you can set the SCP screen to display on the LCD and when your eye goes to the viewfinder it will turn off to save batteries. When your eye is removed from the EVF the SCP will come on again. Hope this is what you wanted. Rob
 
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ac12

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One more thing. What non-photographer product designer decided to put the power switch on the left top plate? The location on the E-M10 and E-M5i was perfect. You could bring the camera to your eye while turning it on all with one motion. Now it takes two hands to do the same.
As part of their retro design, Olympus copied the location of the power switch from the OM series film cameras.
BUT, that was a DUMB idea, as even back in the 1970s it was not an easy to use location.
Nikon and Mamiya/Sekor both had the meter power switch on the film advance lever, where it was easy and fast to use.

The only camera that I can think of that had a worse power switch was the Minolta SRT-101. The switch was a rotating plate on the bottom of the camera, that you had to put your thumb on, push and rotate. A real PiA to use. My friend with a SRT-101 would simply turn it on, and leave it on for the duration of the shoot.

To conserve battery power, especially on a mirrorless, you "should" turn the camera off when you can. But in practice, to do that, the power switch has to be convenient to use. The more inconvenient the power switch the less it will be used.
And no, the power switch is NOT perfect on the EM10. I still need to move my right hand to the left deck to turn it on.
Left hand is under the camera, right hand is on the right grip. To reach the left deck, I have to move either right or left hand.
The power switch should be where Nikon and Canon have it on their dSLRs, around the shutter button; or in that area where it is easy and fast to use, without moving the hand (or very little). Otherwise it will be just as it is now, I turn it on and leave it on, until I put down the camera.
 

mauve

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The power switch should be where Nikon and Canon have it on their dSLRs, around the shutter button; or in that area where it is easy and fast to use, without moving the hand (or very little). Otherwise it will be just as it is now, I turn it on and leave it on, until I put down the camera.
Agreed, and to add insult to injury, the power switch on the E-M5 mk II feels really flimsy. At least on the E-M10 mk II or III, it feels really heavy duty.
Luckily, the quick sleep mode we were talking about earlier is rather fast and efficient, so you can leave the camera on for most of the shooting without killing your battery.

M.
 

retiredfromlife

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Is the tripod mount hole shorter on this camera? I can't screw in my tripod plate with the same screw I use to hold my E-M10 or my older E-M5. I actually have to add a washer to take up space so that it will tighten down. This seems odd to me.
I find the depth of the tripod mount hole on bodies varies a bit on all cameras. I have measured mine, film and digital and it varies from 5mm to 6.5 mm. This is how far the threads go not how deep the hole is. I use a 1/4" whitworth bolt with a tapped plate to measure the effective hole depth. I wind the bolt in them lightly wind the plate down till it touches the body and measure the length of the bolt that screws in.

I have settles on 5mm for all my tripod mounting screws. I screw the quick release plate or tripod bolt into a 5mm plate and either pack with a washer or grind the end off if it is just a burr or if packing with a washer causes the quick release plate to foul.

The plastic inserts like on the TG5 seem to be the worst offenders for hole depth.
 
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One more thing. What non-photographer product designer decided to put the power switch on the left top plate? The location on the E-M10 and E-M5i was perfect. You could bring the camera to your eye while turning it on all with one motion. Now it takes two hands to do the same.
The E-M1 is like that too so the same non-photographer must have worked on it too....
 

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