A few E-P5 questions

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by tkbslc, Jul 25, 2016.

  1. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Legend

    Just got an E-P5 with the recent refurb deals. This is my first Olympus cam, so I have a few things I haven't been able to figure out.

    1- Face Detection AF works awesome. Even better than my GX7. But it doesn't seem to be metering for the face it focuses on. With the GX7, you can see the exposure change when it finds a face to focus on. Can I make the E-P5 do this? It's a real life safer with backlit subjects and the like.

    2- Is there a way I can program a button to switch to Black and White mode? Without having to resort to a MySet? Just quick access to the Photo Style, I guess.

    3 - Should I leave it on 0-sec antishock unless I need burst? Seems not reason not to do that.

    4 - Is there an easy way to access Mysets? I found how I can overwrite the Art position on the Dial, but only with one. And I can stash another one with the magnify button, but this seems cumbersome. Is there a better way?

    5- Can I have the Live Control Panel and Super Control Panel enabled simultaneously? It lets me enable both, but then only shows me Live Control Panel. I like the former better for regular shooting, but there are some settings on Super Control Panel I'd like access to occasionally.

    6- Which is the default JPEG style? It seems like it defaulted to Natural, but that's also #3. I would assume #1 is default, but that's i-enhance. I hear good things about famous Olympus JPEGs and want to use the right one for that as I shoot a lot of JPEG.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    # 5 will help solve a number of your issues I think. You can cycle between screens (Normal shooting, Live Control & SCP) with a press of the OK key (other screen modes are changed with the Info key). It is an easy thing to touch select the shooting mode in the SCP & rotate the front (top) dial to change the setting/value & that way you can quickly change to B&W (Monotone).
     
  3. Growltiger

    Growltiger Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 26, 2014
    UK
    3 - Correct.
    4 - Use another dial position - multiscene. Or switch using the menu.
    6 - Yes, Natural, 3. I stick to that.

    For highest quality JPGs:
    First allow the highest quality:
    - G Record modes/Color/WB
    -- Record mode set: 1: Change from LF to L-SF
    Then use it:
    Go to Shooting menu 1:
    - Record mode: Still Picture: change from LN to LSF or LSF+RAW (set Custom G first)
     
  4. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Legend

    That's what I had hoped, but it does not seem to work. If I enable Live Control and SCP, when I press OK it pulls up Live Control. When I press OK again, it just goes back to shooting. No SCP unless I disable Live control. I even tried holding and double clicking OK. But it only likes one or the other.
     
  5. spdavies

    spdavies Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Apr 9, 2013
    Hawaii
    Stephen
    Enable both - click OK to call them up - use INFO button to switch back & forth between them.
     
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  6. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    That is correct. I first tried the OK button & thought that it brought up both but didn't try the Info key after it & that is needed to cycle between Live Control & SCP.
    Edit: I don't (normally) have Live Control enabled & didn't check properly before giving advice.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
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  7. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Legend

    Thanks, that works!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Shadetree

    Shadetree Mu-43 Regular Subscribing Member

    47
    Jun 1, 2013
    Chattanooga, TN
    Butch
    Does the E-P5 have a SCP like the one on the OM-D E-M5?
     
  9. jackthehat

    jackthehat Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Mar 8, 2014
    Cumbria, UK
    I must say that the E-P5 has a serious problem with shutter shock (edge blur of subjects at shutter speeds around 1/320 sec). No amount of messing around with the anti-shock settings will cure the problem. I sold mine for that reason. The only way to avoid the problem is to avoid using shutter speeds of 1/200 to 1/400 whenever possible. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but I wish someone had told me this when I bought my E-P5.
    Other than that, it is an excellent camera and very well made. I hope you enjoy it.
     
  10. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    It would be similar.
     
  11. JDS

    JDS Mu-43 Veteran

    246
    Nov 11, 2014
    San Francisco, CA
    David Schultz
    The EP5 is one of my most-used cameras, I've never seen an image with shutter shock. I normally use the anti-shock setting (no reason to avoid is as far as I can tell), but I often shoot low or high burst mode (which doesn't have a anti-shock setting) and just never see it. Maybe it's only a problem with certain lenses (although I've used all kinds of lenses on mine), certain production runs, earlier firmware etc.? I'm not doubting that you had a problem with it, but my seems 100% fine. Love the camera...
     
  12. jackthehat

    jackthehat Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Mar 8, 2014
    Cumbria, UK
    Well I am genuinely pleased to hear that. I had assumed all models were affected. My most regularly used lens at the time was the Panny 14-140(150?) which had built in IS. Perhaps that contributed to the problem. Logic tells me that longer focal lengths are more likely to be affected than wide angles.
     
  13. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    I don't think you can make the assumption that longer lenses affect the shutter shock issue more. It's a pretty complex issue that manifests itself with due to harmonic resonance frequencies of the combined mass of the body+lens+VF you happen to be using - I think there needs to be some empirical analysis of which combinations have the problem and which don't. I also DO believe that simultaneous IBIS and OIS acting in opposition to one-another is a DIFFERENT problem that may look like shutter shock at the image, but is actually something different, caused by sensor shift that is not acting in coordination with lens stabilization.