A bag for an M1 mk2 and 12-100f4 - Hadley? Lowepro?

PhotoCal

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I don't recommend a shoulder bag as it can lead to neck/back injury.

I'd suggest a waist pack.

One thing to consider is the ability to repurpose a bag. That is, use it for something besides photography. I would not recommend any bag that can't hold an 8 1/2" x 11" piece of paper without folding. Anything that can't hold a piece of paper is useless for work (carrying reports, etc.) which could affect its resale value.
 

RichardC

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I don't recommend a shoulder bag as it can lead to neck/back injury.

I'd suggest a waist pack.

One thing to consider is the ability to repurpose a bag. That is, use it for something besides photography. I would not recommend any bag that can't hold an 8 1/2" x 11" piece of paper without folding. Anything that can't hold a piece of paper is useless for work (carrying reports, etc.) which could affect its resale value.

You shouldn't drink on an empty stomach, especially fortified wines.

I doubt any of my camera bags (I chop and change them regularly) have ever taken a hit on value because they wouldn't accommodate a big piece of paper.

If you are concerned about resale values, buy branded and buy secondhand.

Your point about neckstraps is valid enough with a heavy load, although not everyone is built the same.
 

doady

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The bigger Olympus-brand shoulder bag that I had originally bought for the C-5060WZ, I repurposed to use for the E-M1 II + 12-100mm. It's temporary, but it works well enough. A bag not chosen for its ability to hold letter-sized paper and retain its resale value, but one that was chosen specifically for photography and somehow it is still useful for photography and I don't need to sell it. My next bag will be the same. I probably would have bought one already if not for the pandemic. This thread has given me some ideas but I think I will need to look at some in store first. Of course, I am not sure what my second lens will be either, so maybe I will have to wait for that too.

Some of the pictures in this thread made me wonder if there is a "proper" way to store a SLR or faux-SLR camera in a bag. I see some have the lens pointing downward, some have the lens pointing upward, some sideways. Of course, in the closet, I always store the lens sideways, based on Nikon tech guy advice someone posted in another thread. But for carrying around, it is just a matter of personal preference? Currently, I have lens pointed downward, seems most convenient to have back of the camera already facing me and grip already on the right side. Just grab and go. Why have camera lens pointing upwards? Sorry if this is stupid question. This is my first SLR or faux SLR camera so I was just wondering.
 

Michael Meissner

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Some of the pictures in this thread made me wonder if there is a "proper" way to store a SLR or faux-SLR camera in a bag. I see some have the lens pointing downward, some have the lens pointing upward, some sideways. Of course, in the closet, I always store the lens sideways, based on Nikon tech guy advice someone posted in another thread. But for carrying around, it is just a matter of personal preference? Currently, I have lens pointed downward, seems most convenient to have back of the camera already facing me and grip already on the right side. Just grab and go. Why have camera lens pointing upwards? Sorry if this is stupid question. This is my first SLR or faux SLR camera so I was just wondering.
Everybody is different, and carry their camera differently. And on different days, I will carry things differently.

Generally when I'm going out to shoot, I use a tall shoulder bag (usually Domke Ruggedwear F-5XZ). It is tall enough that I can pack one camera with my largest lens (Olympus 4/3rds 50-200mm + MMF-3 adapter) attached vertically. In this case I pack it with the lens pointing down. I can adjust the center divider so it is enough room for the lens, but the side folds down to take some of the weight off of the lens and under the hand grip of the camera. I pack my second camera and second lens on the other side. The middle compartment is enough that I could pack a third large lens in the middle, or a large flash, or a bunch of small primes. Batteries either go loose on the bottom, or I use battery pouches that fit on the camera strap. I have the gear organized so that I can pick each camera directly without having to look at the bag and keeping my eyes on the subject. If I have to switch to the 3rd lens or flash, then of course I need to look at the gear, but at least to alternate between 2 cameras/2 lenses it works.

If I packed the camera with the LCD on the bottom, I wouldn't have room for the middle compartment because of the side of the hand grip. In addition, I can imagine scratching the rear monitor if something is on the bottom of the bag (such as car keys). Finally if you pull out the camera, you have to pull it by the lens, and the lens can extend as you pull it.

Now, if I'm using a photo backpack things are somewhat different. There I'm not as worried about getting access to the gear as quickly as possible, but more typically I want to cram as much stuff in the bag. Usually such bags have two areas more of less made for a camera and lens. I store at least one of the cameras with a long lens attached, and the other with a shorter lens. Generally, I will use hook and loop material (i.e. velcro [tm]) so the cameras don't fall out. Then I pack lenses or flashes in each of the compartments, mounted vertically. I adjust the dividers so the lens is packed well. Small prime lenses generally get stacked into one compartment. Usually there is a compartment for batteries and flash memory cards. I use various systems to denote which batteries are charged and which are depleted (at the simplest, I have batteries in pouches, and just toss the used batteries in the bag). Depending on the gear and the bag, sometimes I have to make a horizontal space to fit long lenses.
 
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If anything, personal preference rules the choice of bags more than choice of cameras. Fewer choices for the latter compared to the huge range of choices in bags. I have seen many recommendations for Domke, Hadley, and Ona shoulder bags, and even recommended Tenba myself, but my personal preference is for sling bags or backpacks. Furthermore, I like bags that provide access while wearing over bags I would have to lay down to access. Hence, I prefer those offering side access. Everybody has their preferences. Celebrate the choices! :)
 

Bushboy

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Lowepro topload zoom.
A very good bag indeed.
Made for a film SLR and 70-200 zoom attached.
I still have mine and use it every day. Got 14mm pancake in bottom, then 45-150 kit zoom, then M5mkii with 30mm macro, then fl600 on the top. Easy. In accessory pouch on front, batteries, release cable, couple of filters. Easily swallow your cam and lens. Very comfortable carry.
Has lasted a long time, and most likely will see me out. If that’s gonna give you back and neck pain, better get a wheelchair too.
 
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Another vote for Tenba here. Well made, water resistant, and lots of useful features. The Messenger DNA 11 will hold the M1.3 with 12-100, plus have room for a few extra things. The DNA 13 will hold the 1.3+12-100, and the 100-400 vertically not mounted.
 

Mike Wingate

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Tenba DNA 10. Plenty of room, good zips, silent velcro. Pockets everywhere. Waist strap, rain cover. Good access through protected zip on top of bag.
 

ata3001

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Jan 26, 2019
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Niagara Falls, NY USA
I have for sale a
Billingham Hadley Small Pro
Used but pristine, no wear
Blk canvas/blk leather
If you have any interest.
 

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fortwodriver

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How about the Thinktank Retrospective. I got the 5 v2.0 and I love it. It's small, but I've spent years figuring out what to (or what not to) carry. Nice and soft shoulder strap. There are larger versions. Get it on sale, though, as they can be a bit expensive.

Before that I used a Crumpler Dry Red Number 2 (not a camera bag - more of a man-purse) and made dividers out of neoprene lens cases. Worked like a charm but I wanted to use it for toiletries on the go.

On my cameras I have Artisan and Artist cross-chest straps that have pull-system to shorten and lengthen them when needed.
 
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