7-14mm: Learning to "see" anew

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Crdome, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    For my partial retirement from one job, my loyal and generous volunteers provided me a gift certificate towards the purchase of a new lens. I'm deeply touched. This is a lens I could only dream about, but never afford.

    Saturday was my first outing and I rapidly discovered that much I knew about composition no longer applied apply. I have partially adjusted getting substantially closer to the subject, but the lens is unhappy and demands I be more aggressive to shoot "up close and in your face". This beauty is capable of unbridled magic. May I be worthy of her desires.

    So here we are day one:

    406 Main Street
    406_Main_St_570_sm.

    406 Main Reflected
    Forals_and_stripes_web.

    Ventilation-perfusion mismatch
    Ventilation-perfusion_mismatch_487_web.

    Scene of an alley
    Transformers_Scene_from_an_alley_500_web.

    Cobbler Shoppe
    Cobbler_Shoppe_web.

    5ยข
    547_5_coke_web.

    Reflections in a dirty window
    Relections_in_a_dirty_window_576_sm-web.

    Comments are appreciated to help me tame this beast.
     
  2. grantb

    grantb Mu-43 Veteran

    Congrats Chrome, love the self-p.

    One thing that has helped me a lot with using this lens was to turn on the internal level on my E-P3. I'm not sure if you have it on your camera, but you can get a cheap little spirit level which goes on the hot shoe. With a level you can keep your lines straight and make buildings look surprisingly natural (when you want to, of course). It's a super lens, enjoy!

    Edit: you have to level front-back and side-side for this to work.
     
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  3. DHart

    DHart Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 7, 2010
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Don
    crdome... keep at it buddy... she will bend to your desires and please beyond your dreams! Promise. :wink:

    Keep getting up REAL close to your foreground subject and let the lens take in the distant beyond as well. Don't forget rule of thirds in this process. And stop down as needed, but not too much, to get the full depth in focus. In cases with distant breadth landscapes and nondescript foregrounds, don't be afraid to crop out the lower 1/4 or 1/3 of the frame to display the wide width and crop out the wide height. And if skies are looking wonderful, frame to include much more sky and little earth.

    Choose small objects and place them within a foot or two of the lens... indoors, outdoors, wherever. You don't need a vast landscape for her to display her prowess.

    Let her display all the perspective drama she is capable of... and she will serve you magnificently!
     
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  4. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Thanks. My GH2 has a grid screen. Unfortunately it's been "misplaced" for a while through happenstance. Only after my shoot did I reconnect with the proper menu to restore. There is an exponentially greater amount if visual information in the FOV to keep orientated. As long as I can keep my main axes square to the frame I do well. Where I see it falling apart to a degree is this lens excels shooting along a plane rather than square at it, creating converging lines, but that's where I;ll be exploring in y shooting and accept the lens' defining optics.

     
  5. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Don, your suggestions are the realities I'm beginning to understand. Close-up in terms of inches and feet. I have a question about aperture. It seems the lens thrives on tiny apertures for DOF. Unlike wide, normal and telephoto lens, is f/22 an acceptable here or should I step down to f/16 or larger?

    After studying your postings, I'm beginning to appreciate the relationship of "big Sky" in 4/3 composition. Shooting 616 film I fell in love with ratios similar to 16:9. and mostly have no problem cropping ruthlessly. Since it wouldn't cost anything, I wish Panasonic provided a Panavision ratio format on its cameras too. I am enchanted with the tight vertical crop produced there.

     
  6. Liamness

    Liamness Mu-43 Veteran

    375
    Apr 20, 2011
    You should never stop down below f/8 on any lens when using a m43 camera, as diffraction will soften the image. To be honest, with such a wide lens, deep focus will usually be achievable wide open. Of course, this depends on the focus distance.
     
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  7. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Chrome: if you have a smartphone, get a depth of field calculator app and/or read up on hyperfocal distance. Or play around with one online (just google 'depth of field calculator' and you should be fine...). Go past F8 or so and you start hitting diffraction. Ultrawides don't need quite as much stopping down to get you massive DoF.

    As an example: for a subject 2 feet away, focussing at 1.9 feet at an F stop of F5.6 will give you everything from 1 foot in front of the subject to infinity in focus. No need to go to F22.
     
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  8. dre_tech

    dre_tech Mu-43 Veteran

    314
    Jan 31, 2012
    Enjoy the lens. Seems like you got it down with the composition.

    The second image shows what the more difficult type of shots is. You either have to be in the middle (like in the first photo) or turn left a little. Otherwise you'll see that the walls aren't parallel and right angles aren't quite 90degrees.
     
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  9. Redridge

    Redridge Mu-43 Regular

    151
    Apr 17, 2012
    focus in an a subject real close, apply rule of thirds, let the lens do its magic...

    ND3_1871.

    ND3_1960.
     
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  10. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    I have a tendency toward telephoto lenses so I can see where a person would need to develop a new way of seeing with a very wide lens. Looks as if you are well on your way. Enjoy the lens!
     
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  11. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    This lens is fine stopped down. The very slight softening is mixed with the very slight light fall off, and you'll be pixel peeping to even see that. My old dallmeyer wide angle rectilinear. stops down to f180 and that len doesn't get soft until f135. The WAR design, which the 7-14 is included in, was designed to be slower over the later rapid rectilinear designs. So don't be afraid to slow this lens down.

    Hey CR you get a deal on your 7-14? The price on this thing is so volatile. I know this lens is why I still have my m4/3 system.. that and the legacies. hmm.. just thought of something, we need to have movable sensors...
     
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  12. Liamness

    Liamness Mu-43 Veteran

    375
    Apr 20, 2011
    No lens on any system would be sharp at f/135. I assume you're talking about large format cameras, which is a bit of a silly comparison given the physical difference involved. You shouldn't stop any m43 lens past f/8 if you can avoid it. Diffraction will begin to be a limiting factor on sharpness, and this is true of all lenses, even converted one. That's just the way things are. There is no need to stop down further anyway, f/8 gives you plenty of DOF, particularly if you try to find the hyperfocal distance.
     
  13. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    f22 iso 100 1/3sec
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/65464494@N05/7336769112/" title="20120604-_1190697.jpg by slimmerjim, on Flickr">"500" height="375" alt="20120604-_1190697.jpg"></a>

    F8 iso100 1/25 sec
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/65464494@N05/7336772930/" title="20120604-_1190698.jpg by slimmerjim, on Flickr">"500" height="375" alt="20120604-_1190698.jpg"></a>

    OK, ran out for a snapshot in the backyard. Conditions light rain light wind. PP white balance only, shot it in raw. so I had to. personally I prefer the f22...
     
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  14. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    The physics in the design of a WAR must be amazing. Thanks for your insights. I assume your f/180 dallmeyer was a large format lens. In fact was it for 5x7 or 8x10?

    I bought the lens at a price far less than you or I could imagine, which was essential, since it was the top dollar I could afford. The gentleman worked with me on price, and was extremely conservative in describing it as "nearly mintish". I could see no indication it had been out of the box or on a camera. He indicated he used it twice. It was mailed Priority late Saturday of Memorial Day weekend and delivered by noon on Tuesday.

    What an amazing piece of glass!


     
  15. DHart

    DHart Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 7, 2010
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Don
    That it is! Wonderful optical quality and amazing field of view - capable of creating wonderfully dramatic images that couldn't be made without it.

    I'm glad you were able to squeek into getting one within your budget... that's awesome. I think this lens will be an oft-mounted piece of glass for you, as it is for me.
     
  16. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Dre_tech, thanks for your comments. That is why I included the two photos together. I spent much of the day shooting glass. Dead center it becomes a self portrait. Off to the side it's convergence. For me this may become an issue of pure aesthetics vs: aesthetics of reality, relative to the lens' design and intent. Each can have it place in my expanding concepts of beauty and presentation. Actually the first photo was far from dead center so was subjected to substantial perspective cropping to acquire an image with square and parallel lines.

    One of many consulting aspects I preform is photo documenting corporate art collections for appraisal. I refer to this as "field photography" since the shoots often occur in hostile environments, unconducive for ease of capture. Large volumes of space are filled with cubicle, fluorescent lighting, large expanses of windows, and most often glazing on the object. I have become a master of glare and reflection remediation, using a point and shoot ultra zooms often from 50' away standing on desks, file cabinets or standing teetering on the convergence of the top edges of cubical walls, and often at acute angles to the picture plane. Obviously I use perspective cropping.

     
  17. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    it's a half plater so it's 4x5. it could probably do 5x7, not sure don't have one, but I get good movements on the 4x5, and 90 to 100 degrees fov. It's defintely a primitive version of the Panny.

    Man good on you for getting a good price. I suggest a good case for it, those lumix cases are a bit of a joke. Can't wait to see whatyou do with it.
     
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  18. jnewell

    jnewell Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 23, 2011
    Boston, MA
    Those of us who are a little dense :) and lean toward the telephoto perspective appreciate these two excellent reminders! :2thumbs: :cool:

     
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  19. Bill

    Bill Mu-43 Regular

    176
    Apr 15, 2009
    Brisbane, Australia
    Bill (really)
    I would like to suggest a Ken Rockwell article that I found very useful:

    How to Use Ultra-Wide Lenses

    By the way, I love my 7-14mm.

    Good luck,

    Bill
     
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  20. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Thanks Bill. I browsed it befor my shooting expedition. Obviously I would have had some better shots had I read the entire article as I did now. It's easy to see why the 7-14 can become a lens of choice.