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50mm legacy lens

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by juangrande, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    I recently sold my 45mm oly and others to reduce the costs of my kit as I am very much a rank amateur. I also have been buying some legacies @ or <$100. I researched 50mm's to replace the 45( mostly for indoor portraiture) and settled on the Minolta 1.4 PG. Here's a few from this lens which I received today. So far I'm pleased w/it on my EM5. The last one has a haze from shooting with the bright contrast behind it. Is that from old lens designs and/or coatings?

    Feel free to post other legacy shots from equivalent FL.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    I would guess it's just the nature of the lens. Digital lenses are designed with aspherical elements and newer coatings to optimize digital photos. Older lenses had different properties because of the different requirements for film. Still - a very nice lens and some great shots.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    If you shot RAW you can get rid from most of the haze by playing with contrast.
    I have done it on my photos and it is doing miracle to such problem.
     
  4. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    It's because of older coatings and possilbly to some degree the lens' condition (haze on the internal surfaces, excessive dust, ...).

    Older lens designs are generally less prone to flare. They were designed with the then current coating technology in mind. Many older designs relied on cemented elements, something more difficult to make (read: more expensive), that air spaced elements since the cemented elements have fewer glass-to-air surfaces, the source of the flare. Modern designs are often all air spaced (e.g. 7 elements in 7 groups = 14 glass-to-air surfaces, 12 internal) whereas some old classic designed are mostly cemented groups (e.g. the true Sonnar designs that are 7 element in only 3 groups = 6 glass-to-air groups, only 4 internal). Most modern zooms wouldn't be useable without the modern coatings.
     
  5. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    This lens was sold as virtually dust free and no scratches or haze. As far as I can tell that's accurate. Looking thru the lens into light it looks as clear as my new PL25. Is there a technical term for this phenomenon (ie the photo in question)?
     
  6. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    You don't need to shoot RAW to correct that. Just clip the dynamic range in the Levels dialogue in Photoshop. Very easy, and mostly non-destructive even in JPG. Of course your DR will be more compressed than a shot that was perfect from the start, but your adjustments will only improve and do no harm to the image since you are only clipping areas of non-data.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Two of my favorite 50mm legacy lenses are the Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.4, and the Zuiko 50mm f/1.4...

    konica_hexanon_50mm_1,4_web.
    g_zuiko_50mm_1,4_web.

    Another 50mm I'm fond of but in a totally different way is the very old Soviet Jupiter-3 50mm f/1.5 based off the Carl Zeiss Sonnar formula (mine is a 1953 model, 60 years old - older versions like mine actually use Zeiss parts)...

    jupiter-3_web.
     
  8. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Yes, "flare". Flare is a FOL. Coatings reduce flare and the more modern coatings are much better than the older ones. Flare, though, still occurs. With "legacy" lenses it will occur much more often even when the lens is in perfect condition.
     
  9. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    There is a better test. Look through the lens toward a dark area and shine a small flashlight (harsh single LED flashlights work very well) into the far side of the lens aiming toward you but slightly out of view. This will show subtle haze not otherwise visible.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. McBob

    McBob Mu-43 Regular

    111
    Apr 22, 2012
    Ned, my olde-timey Zuiko 50/1.4 came with exactly the same collapsible hood... wonder if there was a bundled special way back when :D
     
  11. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    Well, part of my continuing education I suppose. Upon viewing from the front w/the flashlight in back, I see some dust. Not too much. Upon reversing the position I see the haze!:frown: The lens shoots well enough if I avoid the bright backgrounds. I examined my other lenses,too. The PL 25 has dust also, but a little less than the Rikkor. So I suppose it's impossible to have a dust free lens. I have a tokina 90 macro which is really sharp, even at infinity, with dust and slight hazing. Should the 25 PL be completely clear? If so, I can still send it back. Thanks everyone and Amin for this blog. Much to learn!
     
  12. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    Anybody?
     
  13. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    You can also burn shadows (nice in digital that you can burn HL, shadows, and mid tones separately.) I've got rid of flare in numerous photos by careful burning of shadows and midtones in the affected area and levels adjustments like Ned mentioned.

    There are certainly modern lenses that you cannot shoot straight into that kind of light without getting flare. It's just a difficult photographic situation that even very good modern lenses might have some trouble with.