48-Hour Post Processing Challenge #567

GregRed

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#1

Luminar 4 > Topaz Sharpen AI

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GregRed

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Luminar 4 > Topaz Sharpen AI

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Thai-Mike

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#1

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Thai-Mike

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betamax

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beautiful Spot Robert. Heres my attempt using LR for iPad.
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relic

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Entry #2: Applied ON1 Effects "Cool" followed by "Cool shadows" filters to entry #1.

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... and I thought your white balance was off.... :whistling:
I still think the white balance is "off". RawTherapee reports that the camera had chosen a colour temperature of 4526K. As far as I know, such temperatures only occur around sunrise/sunset (and even then, you may want to stick to a 'normal' daylight colour temperature of around 5000K). The photo was taken at 9:56am in September, and sunrise was at 6:20am, so it was well past golden hour. So I cannot imagine 4526K was the "correct" white balance.

Of course, you can choose a cooler temperature for artistic reasons. You could turn any mountain range into Blue Mountains, if you wanted. There is no "correct" white balance. ;)
 

BosseBe

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I still think the white balance is "off". RawTherapee reports that the camera had chosen a colour temperature of 4526K. As far as I know, such temperatures only occur around sunrise/sunset (and even then, you may want to stick to a 'normal' daylight colour temperature of around 5000K). The photo was taken at 9:56am in September, and sunrise was at 6:20am, so it was well past golden hour. So I cannot imagine 4526K was the "correct" white balance.

Of course, you can choose a cooler temperature for artistic reasons. You could turn any mountain range into Blue Mountains, if you wanted. There is no "correct" white balance. ;)
DxO PL3 reports the WB as 5059K for the Raw file.
 
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OK I realise I'm going a bit overboard here, but I just installed Olympus Workspace on my work laptop (which runs Windows) to see what white balance it would report. It showed 5547K... Who am I supposed to trust now? 😭

I knew these Kelvin values are an approximation, but it did not expect such large differences. Always fun to learn new things. Sorry for hijacking your thread, @Robert Davidson. 😇
 

BosseBe

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OK I realise I'm going a bit overboard here, but I just installed Olympus Workspace on my work laptop (which runs Windows) to see what white balance it would report. It showed 5547K... Who am I supposed to trust now? 😭

I knew these Kelvin values are an approximation, but it did not expect such large differences. Always fun to learn new things. Sorry for hijacking your thread, @Robert Davidson. 😇
Maybe we should start a new thread to explore how White Balance works?
 
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Do you have to use an 18% greycard and manually white balance for accuracy? Or a white card? I never do but.... the camera meter looks at everything as an 18% greycard. We were taught to use an incident meter to measure light falling on the scene instead of reflecting light from the in camera meter.
 

RichardC

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It is common to get a blue cast in landscape photographs. It’s to do with the interaction of light with water particles. The further away (therefore the more atmosphere between you and your background) the greater the effect. If your white balance is set to foreground, the background can appear bluer.

In this case, you’ve got a huge amount of rising warm moist air coming off the trees, plus as Robert describes, droplets of eucalyptus oil.
 
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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #38
Do you have to use an 18% greycard and manually white balance for accuracy? Or a white card? I never do but.... the camera meter looks at everything as an 18% greycard. We were taught to use an incident meter to measure light falling on the scene instead of reflecting light from the in camera meter.
I still have an old Weston light meter that does reflective and incident light readings!
 
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