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360 photo sphere

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by Nathanael, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. Nathanael

    Nathanael Mu-43 Veteran

    377
    Oct 12, 2015
    Anyone have experience with stitching these things? Kind of weird to describe, but I'm sure most of you have seen it before. Basically you take enough photos to cover a full 360 degrees in all directions (or use a special 360 camera), stitch them together and then project it in a virtual reality sphere. So you have to pan around the image to see the full 360, like Google Street View.

    Anyways. I made a pretty sloppy first attempt with a total of 5 photos with my 7.5mm. I wanted to share using the new Facebook feature which presents your image in the interactive panning setup. I got it to work, but i used a mixture of lightroom defishing profiles, photoshop photomerge, extensive warping with adaptive wide angle, blending, cloning, etc. Messy but eventually I filled up the 2:1 canvas with something. But not projected correctly so the top of the sphere is super distorted. (of course) Definitely need more than 5 frames next time. Feels like the fisheye effect messes things up as you tilt up or down though..

    Ok SHORT VERSION: What is the best way to orient a fisheye when taking the photos. What's the best way to put those into a 2:1 equirectangular projection. It needs to be exactly 2:1 to be recognized as 360 photo.

    @wjiang@wjiang I feel like you might be the man with my answers.


    Here's what I came up with for a first attempt

    https://www.facebook.com/natemyton/posts/10208896183955965
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2016
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  2. christofp

    christofp Mu-43 Regular

    135
    Jul 21, 2012
    I use the 7.5 fisheye too. But defishing is the wrong way, the world is a sphere, not flat. Instead, you should stay with a fisheye or sphere projection until the final projection. If your tool does not support that, it's the wrong tool.

    I take 6 shots in portrait orientation, one additional sky and one floor. I set exposure and white balance to a fix value. All shots from tripod and with a L-bracket and a short macro rail for correct axis.

    I import them to opensource stitcher "Hugin", select equirectangular projection and stitch. In a second workthrough, I have to mask out tripod leg relicts (or my fingers if I haven't been careful enough), correct horizon if it was not detected in first attempt, but thats it. Perfect result.

    Christof
     
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  3. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Exactly as christofp said - you need a tool that stays in a 3D spherical working space until final output, I too use Hugin. It's the same technique for making full 'little planets' (just a different output projection).

    I'll add that if you prefer PS's edge merging algorithm or need to do touch ups (Hugin isn't always perfect), you can still output the individual reprojected frames from Hugin in addition to the blended result.
     
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  4. Nathanael

    Nathanael Mu-43 Veteran

    377
    Oct 12, 2015
    THANK YOU! @christofp@christofp and @wjiang@wjiang

    I made it difficult by taking too few pictures which made the merging in Photoshop a hard time. I knew that Hugin was good for re-projecting single images, but didn't know that it would do the stitching and everything as well.

    I'll give it another shot. Thanks guys.
     
  5. christofp

    christofp Mu-43 Regular

    135
    Jul 21, 2012
    Ha, for me the experience with Hugin was the other way round: I did not know how to defish a single photo in Hugin. The wizard always asked for more than one photo. 3 months later I discovered that there is a expert-mode UI too ... :dash2:

    I watched your 360° photo now, very cool. I recently started taking astro photos again but your location is really wonderful!